DAHAb & THE RED SEA
DAHAb & THE RED SEA
Dahab
Dahab

The Bedouin village of Dahab, once known as a place for hippies and drop-outs, is about 80 km north from Sharm el Sheikh on the East coast of the Sinai Peninsula and is surrounded by a bizarre high mountainous landscape. The region of Dahab stretches across a wide plateau of rock and sand and emerged from a small oasis where Bedouins once settled.

Diving camps were set up in the areas around this inconspicuous little town, and then in the past few years developed into a diving and holiday paradise.

The name Dahab means ‘gold’ in English and was named after the shimmering gold-colored sandy coast.
The name Dahab means ‘gold’ in English and was named after the shimmering gold-colored sandy coast.

Dahab’s atmosphere is relaxed and easy going, without mass tourism, huge Hotel complexes, Nightclubs or Discos. Among divers known as one of the best wall – and cave diving destinations in the Red Sea. Along the seafront, there’s a great array of cosy cafés, typical shisha places, restaurants and lots of little shops.

Al Bahr al-Ahmar: The Red Sea
Al Bahr al-Ahmar: The Red Sea
Between Africa & Asia

Surrounded by vast deserts, the Red Sea expands 2000 km (1300 miles) from the north, the Gulf of Aqaba, to Bab el Mandeb in the south.

The Gulf of Aqaba ending at the Straits of Tiran reaches a length of 180 km (110 miles). Following the Syrian-African Rift Valley the Gulf is 25 km (14 miles) wide, and 1800 m (6000 feet) deep. Fringing coral reefs which are amazing dive sites developed all along the coastline.

SALTY & FULL OF LIFE

There are many special aspects about the Red Sea where the water temperature is relatively constant. During summer maximum 28 º C and in winter not less than 21 º C. Seldom storms and rainfall (occasionally in winter), as well as mild currents prevent sediments to slow coral growth and allow excellent visibility. This is why the conditions are ideal for divers of all levels.

Low humidity and the high rate of evaporation due to high temperatures, make the Red Sea one of the saltiest life-sustaining seas in the world. Salinity reaches 4.1 % and therefore a large variety of endemic species have developed.